Cooleeney Brie cake with green cherry tomato coulis

Wood puff ball
Wood puff ball

After a walk in the local forest a couple of weeks ago, hunger came knocking with a vengeance. I had to get  off the woods, all those mushrooms and colours of October inspired me. I made my way back to the kitchen and just got an idea… A cheesy Autumnal treat.

Ripe Cooleeney
Ripe Cooleeney

I made a “champ”, mash potatoes with spring onions, with a bith of butter and milk but not too wet. I mixed in an egg yolk and a bit of flour… I chopped and sautéed a few mushrooms, with fresh organic Irish garlic and tender thyme leaves from the garden and chunk of Cooleeney Brie. I mixed the lot, made little cakes and covered them with flour. I fried them for a few minutes on each side and left them in the oven for a bit. My friend gave me some green cherry tomatoes and I had to find a quick and easy way to accomodate them into this dish…

Mushrooms'n' Green Cheery Tomatoes
Mushrooms’n’ Green Cheery Tomatoes

I sliced the green cherry tomatoes in halves, and fried them in a pan with coriander seeds and a red onion, added some lemon juice and a dollop of honey. Blitz the lot with a bit of water, sieved it in a pan for after. It was ready to go, with the flavours of October on a plate… Pretty comforting too, especially after an Autumn walk, of Brie,  green and gold.

Cooleeney Cakes with green cherries coulis
Cooleeney Cakes with green cherries coulis

Salt of the Earth

Coarse, Flower & Flakes

I grew up in abandoned salt marshes, my playground. Running for hours amongst the Statice Sea Lavender, on mud levees and embankments, pole vaulting old sea channels to the sounds of Blue Throats and Avocets; what else would a boy want? I spent hours by a Fort-like salt loft, stone ruins and last landmark of a once prosperous time. I’ve often wondered what it must have been like, 1750 to 1950, when the last “Paludier”, the last salt harvester finally retired. Decades later, this land once reclaimed was being called back by nature, leaving echoes to the imagination, patrolled by marsh harriers as lonesome shepherds.

Avocet

Life has a funny way to answer a child’s question. Few years later, I became a trainee wildlife guide, in the Regional Park of Brière, not too far from Nantes or the harbour of St Nazaire, the place that launched a thousand ships… Well, a good few anyway! One of the visits was of course the Salt Marshes of Guérande, still going strong with almost 2000 hectares of basins and channels. I finally got my time travel, a chance to see and share what it must have been like, back in my marshes due west, 200 years ago. The chance to see this unusual harvest, the fruit of the sea, the wind and the sun in an almost biblical trilogy!

Guerande Marshes

So, how does it work? Well, first you need an Ocean, in this case the Atlantic. Then you need an estuary, with ramifications of channels going inside flatland prairies and marshes. The channel will feed smaller channels that will feed man built basins, themselves feeding smaller basins where only a film of water would be kept. The water, first regulated by large wooden locks was finally allowed through simple small slates, gathering important trace elements from the estuary, making it one of the finest salts in Europe. The top layer is the cream, called fleur de sel or Flower of Salt; a delicate hand harvested condiment for fish, tomatoes and roasted vegetables. The bottom part makes the famous grey coarse salt, ideal for cooking and, so you know, quite low in sodium!

Atlantic Ocean

Salt Harvest in Brittany

I was really excited to see some Irish producers from West Cork or Mayo having a go at producing, like in Brittany, unprocessed sea salt, the methods and initial support for production might be a bit different but yet, they all share the same trilogy of elements and an uncompromising bond and respect for the product and the environment. Real unprocessed salt, may it be Breton or Irish, is not your enemy. Salt is loyal, salt is wild, it is a cure for many ills and heals wounds, it preserves and protects. As a seasoning, may it be on your last sweet tomatoes of the year, on a simple pan fried white fish or the secret ingredient to a chocolate sauce, think traditional, unconditionnal sea salt in your cooking!

Autumn Tomatoes
Autumn Tomatoes